diaemyung:

My reaction to murahimu official illustration. 【X】

ibelievepracticemakesperfect:

BittersweetDisease/Foervraengd’s Tutorial Series - Understanding Anatomy

[Part 1] - Introduction

[Part 2] - Drawing The Base

[Part 3] - The Torso

[Part 4] - The Legs

[Part 5] - Arms & Hands

[Part 6] - Gesture

[Part 7] - Bodyshapes

typette:

eehn:

I did some anatomy. Full view to see my tiny, tiny notes.

it’s always hard for me to remember this so, reblogging for everyone else like me :C

archiemcphee:

UK-based artist Susanna Bauer has exceptional needlework skills and, we’re guessing, a very gentle touch, that enable her to use dried leaves as a canvas for some of her miniature art pieces.

“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.”

The next time you find a dried leaf, pick it up and examine just how fragile they are and you’ll be all the more amazed by Susanna Bauer’s beautiful artwork. Visit her website to check out more of her work.

[via Design Taxi]

lookbookdotnu:

LITTLE MOON. (by Rachel-Marie Iwanyszyn)

demkiwichans:

A starry sky brush I made myself for a gift artwork
I wanted to save this brush somewhere so I would be able to go back to it
thought I might as well share it!

also you can find elemap and brushtex I used here

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Hands

This is the first post about hands. Other posts about hands in the future will cover “hands in relationship to the body”, “different characters, different hands”, “expressive hands” and “hands touching things”. If you have suggestions for Tuesday Tips, write me a personal message.

Norm

vampire-gerard:

ask-dr-knockout:

meelo-dot-net:

a public service announcement

This.

You will only end up with mud on your palette and tears on your face

burdschool:

WHY ART SCHOOL SUCKS

I’ve seen many artists who felt awful for not being able to go to artschool. Please watch this, and get some other perspectives. It’s not as bad as you think.